Switch TV Feature

We had the good fortune to be featured on Switch TV, check out the video below.

Special thanks to JP Mersey and Wairimu for making time to be interviewed as well as our Lead Trainer Malibu.

And Happy 2019 to our readers and subscribers.

Ride Safe!

Masomo Monday- Crash Chain/Ladder of Risk

Today we hope to learn a couple of lessons on the how and why of crashes from Shakis’ experience. Comments and Observations are welcome.

I woke up nice and eary Saturday morning excited🤗😃 to meet up the ladies for Ceri’s visit. The weather is beautiful🌞 outside, It’s going to be an amazing ride🏍🏍, I tell myself.
I take my bike for a wash. Can’t show up with dust for the week.
I get on the road headed to mombasa road.
As I join limuru road, I remember a pal of mine wants a tv stand like mine. So I start looking out for the fundi by the road where I got mine from with the intention to pass by on my way back home later on.

I look up…Alas😬!! Lami imeisha! I slid off the curb nicely, I just saw a cloud of dust! Did I just fall stupidly like that??! How could I forget the bike goes where you are looking???
I get up. Switch off the bike. Skiza the body for any alarming pains, luckily am fine. Just minor aches here n there. I pick up my bike,inspect for damages. Rear brake lever is bent, exhaust pipe imeachana kidogo, left side mirror is spinning like a compas (but I fix it)
Rhoda comes to my rescue. Tests the bike. It’s good to go home. (Shout out to her!!❤)

Truth is I completely didn’t pay attention, lost focus and was careless. What if I had veered into incoming traffic?? What if the side of the road wasn’t clear?? I put my life in danger but I also did get lucky. I thank God. Part of me feels like I had an opportunity to redeem myself and get back before the fall but I panicked.

Lessons learnt:
1. Don’t get too comfortable on the road and lose focus. One small mistake could be the difference between life and death.
2. All the gear, all the damn time!!ATGAT, ATGAT, ATGAT!!
3. When you realize you have done a mistake or you could fall, keep calm and try to redeem yourself;as long as you lessen your risk.

Ride Safe.

Masomo Monday – TSD ( Total Stopping Distance)

Total Stopping Distance is a sum of 3 parts.
1. Perception Distance
2. Reaction Distance
(1&2 are referred as Thinking Distance)
3. Braking Distance

Actual thinking distance varies according to the speed of the bike, your physical and mental condition, your attentiveness and whether or bit you were expecting something to happen.

Good anticipation gives you more stopping distance. Anticipation is much more important than fast reactions. It takes much longer to react to unexpected events than to expected ones – you need less thinking time if you are anticipating events and not just reacting to them.
In the video attached, the rider is not exercising restraint speeding on a two way country road , putting himself and others at risk.

1. Perception Distance
He did not anticipate any hazard in any of the near blind corners on this road, the presence of the truck catches him by surprise. He was in the wrong lane position as he came into the turn, limiting his view through the out the corner. He is still moving and this eats into his braking distance.

2. Reaction Distance
His reaction time is delayed, he takes time to process the truck coming into view. He is still moving eating into his braking distance.

3. Braking Distance
At the speed he is still travelling at his braking distance is limited. He grabs hard onto his brakes. He has lady luck on his side, and squeezes between the truck and the pavement. And his ABS kicked in which prevented his wheels from licking and the bike going into a skid. The scattering noise you hear is the ABS constant release at lock point to brake again. Though in review ABS did increase his braking distance.

Question.
What should he have done different to avoid putting himself and others at risk?

Celebrating women in motorcycling- Anna Katrin

Hadithi Picha’s photo series Women and Motorcycles features Anna Katrin, another one of our InkedBiker former trainees.

Here is a snippet from the original blog post:

In our third segment of the series Women and Motorcycles we feature Anna Katrin. It was amazing that we did Anna’s story just as she was about to leave Kenya for good. However, what’s more fascinating is the fact that her riding story began here in Kenya. Let’s get to know more of Anna’s experience beneath the helmet:

When did you start riding and what motivated you to take up riding ?

I started riding about one-and-a-half years ago. Riding had always been at the back of my mind since I got my driver’s license at the age of 18. However, getting a riding license was a costly affair in Germany at the time and I therefore decided to be content with driving a car. Things looked up when I moved to Nairobi. I became good friends with a Kenyan lady biker and that is when my inspiration to ride was set ablaze again. It was finally time to do it and I am glad I went for it.

Did you have to go through formal training? How was the training experience ?

I enrolled for training at the InkedBiker Rider Training. I got hooked to the fun of riding a bike from the very moment I sat on the bike. My excitement made me want to hit the road on my second day of learning how to ride. The instructors where simply amazing and encouraged one to enjoy biking while at the same time placing great emphasis on rider safety.

To read more about her biking journey, head over to Hadithi Picha’s Post